Sports Car Review: 2020 Toyota GR Supra

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Oct 022020
 

After more than 20 years, Toyota opted to bring back one of its most relished models, the Supra. Latino Traffic Report recently got to test the fifth generation of the sports car, the 2020 GR Supra. From its exterior to its performance, the test model lived up to the Supra’s reputation and its fans’ expectations. Sharing much of its chassis with the BMW Z4 doesn’t hurt either.

Its uniqueness starts with its curb appeal. Its twin-scroll turbo charged in-line six, rear-wheel-drive design, low center of gravity, and optimal weight balance set it apart in the Toyota lineup. However, getting in and out of it can be a challenge.

Under the hood, the 3.0-liter twin-scroll turbo charged in-line six-cylinder engine produces 335 horses with 365 lb.–ft. of torque. For 2021, that power is expected to grow to 382 hp. It’s matched to an eight-speed automatic transmission with paddle shifters and accelerates from zero–60 miles per hour in 4.1 seconds. Unlike its predecessor, however, there is no manual transmission option.

 It has an EPA estimated fuel economy of 24 miles per gallon (mpg) in the city and 31 mpg on the highway. Switching to Sport mode will enhance its performance and engine rumble while sacrificing a bit of fuel economy. It averaged 23.2 mpg during the weeklong test drive.

The test model came in Renaissance Red on the outside with a black leather-trimmed interior, including black sport seats, a black steering wheel and black center console with carbon-fiber accents. The instrument panel was a bit plain, though it did include a four-color Head-up Display.

The infotainment system on the test model included an 8.8-inch touchscreen, the JBL audio system with an amplifier, and Apple CarPlay compatibility. Programming presets, however, was less intuitive than other infotainment systems tested on Toyota products.

Standard safety features on both grades, as well as the Launch Edition, include the pre-collision system with pedestrian detection, lane departure warning with steering assist, and automatic high beams. 

On the test model, adding the blind spot monitor required an extra $1,195 as part of the Driver Assist Package that also included Dynamic Radar Cruise Control, Rear Cross Traffic Alert and Parking Sensors with an emergency braking function. These were particularly handy for protecting the Supra’s front bumper lip.

Pricing for the Supra 3.0 starts at $50,920.  Available in three trim levels, the as-tested price on the mid-range 3.0 Premium came to $58,280.

Si: The GR Supra has the sporty looks and performance that fans have long anticipated. Young men were especially inquisitive during the test drive.

No: Any sports car should offer a manual transmission and while fun to drive, it’s pretty pricey.