Jul 132022
 

1991 Acura NSX

Celebrating a return to its roots and “precision crafted performance,” Acura recently hosted a full-line press drive in Atlanta, GA, led by high performance Type S models. While not technically a launch, the event did offer a chance for Latino Traffic Report (LTR) to drive certain Acura products for the first time, starting at the top of the lineup with its supercar, the 2022 NSX Type S (above) with a twin- turbocharged V6 and three-motor hybrid system that produces 600-horsepower and 492 lb.–ft. of torque and a Gotham Gray matte exterior, as well as the classic 1991 NSX model—rare opportunities indeed.

From the newly reintroduced fifth generation Integra to the six-figure NSX ($171,495), the driving experiences for all models stood out for their nimbleness, firm handling, and responsiveness.

2023 Acura Integra

Not only has the Integra returned to the lineup, so has a six-speed manual transmission for 2023. Powered by the first-ever factory turbocharged 1.5-liter engine with 200 hp and 192 lb.-ft. of torque, the manual version of the Integra sits at the top of the lineup. The drive experience did not disappoint but the standard model with the CVT transmission also produced a sporty response and a serious engine rumble. Pricing for the 2023 Integra starts at $31,895 with destination fees.

2021 Acura TLX Type S

Built on an exclusive platform for Type S performance, the TLX borrows some technology from its super sibling, like a double-wishbone front suspension, to enhance the ride and handling, and Brembo brakes. It’s powered by an all-new 3.0-liter V6 turbo engine inspired by the twin turbo V6 on the NSX. Pricing for the 2022 TLX starts at $39,995 and the Type S at $54,795.

2023 Acura MDX Type S

The MDX will be the first Acura sport utility vehicle (SUV) with a Type S badge. While the test model MDX Type S performed handily, powered by a V6 turbo with 355 hp and supported by an adaptive air suspension, the massage setting in the front seats with nine options, including Shiatsu, also made a big impression. Many premium models offer a massage function but it’s not always easy to find. The button on the MDX was located in the center stack next to buttons for heating and cooling the seats. Pricing for the 2022 MDX starts at $49,795 and the Type S at $67,895.

2022 Aura RDX A VD/Tech

Redesigned in 2019, the RDX was the first to debut Acura’s latest exterior DNA, featuring the new grille with a sunburst effect. At the event, the RDX showcased Acura’s ELS Studio premium sound system created exclusively for Acura by eight-time Grammy Award-winning producer and engineer Elliot Scheiner and his team of experts. He explained that apparently, musicians will take to their cars after recording to hear how a track will sound. Scheiner and his team set about creating a studio sound experience for Acura, culminating in the top-of-the-line ELS Studio 3D Signature Edition featuring 25 speakers and 1000 watts of sound. Versions of the system, including the ELS Studio with 16 speakers, are available on certain Integra, TLX, RDX, and MDX models. Pricing for the 2022 RDX starts at $40,345.

John Paul Diaz

LTR readers will appreciate that Scheiner records at the Tree Sound Studios, co-owned by first generation Cuban-American John Paul Diaz and his father. Diaz joked that as a young man, he had hoped to tour with bands as a roadie but after witnessing the toll the road took on them, “I decided to be a sound engineer instead.” Diaz shared with LTR that he hopes to build stronger connections to Atlanta’s Latino community and to host more Latino artists and musicians at his studio.

(l to R) Jessica Fini and Meliza Humphrey

Also of note were two trailblazers for Acura, Jessica Fini, senior manager, Honda and Acura PR and Meliza Humphrey, senior manager, Acura Marketing. Fini is the first woman to be in this position for both Honda and Acura, and Humphrey, is the first Latina in this position. The timely introduction came on the heels of the Honda’s recently released diversity and inclusion report.

All in all, the lineup effectively represented Acura’s reputation for performance combined with premium features that set it apart in the segment.

 

 

 

 

 

Car Review: 2017 Acura TLX

 Acura, Reviews  Comments Off on Car Review: 2017 Acura TLX
May 152017
 

Acura recently unveiled a 2018 redesign of the Acura TLX at the New York International Auto Show, but the 2017 version still has life in it and Latino Traffic Report recently took the TLX 3.5L Advance for a ride.

The five-passenger TLX offers a sports-sedan blend delivering athleticism and premium refinement. Looking better than it has for a while, its signature Jewel Eye LED headlights, standard on all models, set it apart, while offering excellent illumination. LED lighting can also be found on the taillights, above the license plate and as accents on the side mirrors.

Powered by two high-output direct-injected i-VTEC engines, the test model came with the 3.5-liter V6 with Variable Cylinder Management. It was matched to a nine-speed automatic transmission, one of two available transmissions. It was also equipped with one the latest iterations of Acura precision-handling technologies—Precision All-Wheel Steer (P-AWS)—and paddle shifters for added sportiness. A 2.4-liter four cylinder engine, an eight-speed Dual Clutch transmission, and Super-Handling All-Wheel Drive are also available.

While the four-cylinder offers the best fuel economy, the TLX with the 3.5-liter V6 with P-AWS has an EPA fuel-economy rating of 21 miles per gallon (mpg) in the city and 34 mpg on the highway. I averaged 34.2 mpg overall, but on the highway, the average mpg reached 36. Like it’s siblings,

Electronic Gear Selector

the TLX lacks a shift knob and utilizes push buttons, or an electronic gear selector, in the center console instead, which can be a little unnerving, i.e. you don’t want to push the wrong button at the wrong time. The test model also included the Integrated Dynamic System with Econ, Normal, Sport, and Sport S drive modes. The Sport S mode really revved its performance with added power and tightened handling.

When you step up from a Honda to an Acura, you might expect a little more bells and whistles. You can get ’em, but at a price. TLX models with the 2.4-liter engine can be upgraded to the Technology package and models with the 3.5-liter engine can add Technology or the line-topping Advance Package. Both were included on the test model. The Technology package brought essential features like blind spot information, forward collision warning, and a rear cross traffic monitor, as well as convenience features like perforated leather seating, navigation with voice recognition, the AcuraLink communication system, and Acura ELS Studio premium audio.

The Advance package added Collision Mitigation, Adaptive Cruise Control, ventilated front seats, and front and rear parking sensors, among other features.

All TLX models come equipped with Siri Eyes Free technology that allows the driver to use the features of Siri using familiar voice commands, when paired with a compatible iPhone. Other standard features include the multi-view rear camera, cruise control, Multi-information Display, USB Audio Interface with iPod Integration, Bluetooth streaming audio, keyless access, heated leatherette front seats, and a 60/40 split fold-down rear seatback. Oddly, Bluetooth Hands-Free Wireless telephone is not standard.

Pricing for the 2017 TLX starts at $32,950. The as-tested price came to $43, 540.

: The 2017 TLX Advance offered a sporty ride with a big list of features.

No: Some of the available features should be standard, e.g. blind spot monitor, Bluetooth telephone.