Jul 242017
 

 

Ford Driving Dreams

Latino Traffic Report has learned that Ford Motor Company Fund, the philanthropic arm of Ford Motor Company, recently named the recipients of the Ford Driving Dreams (FDD) Grants at the 88th Annual LULAC National Convention in San Antonio, Texas. A total of $400,000 in scholarships and grants will be awarded to ten Councils and LULAC National Educational Service Centers, Inc. (LNESC) to support programs that encourage students to graduate from high school, and provide resources to help them pursue a higher education.

Ford Fund will award eight LULAC Councils $20,000 each in FDD Grants to implement educational programs over two school years in collaboration with a local education entity. Grant recipients from 2015–LULAC Council #2862 in Sacramento, California. and LULAC Council #313 in Chicago, Illinois–were selected to each receive a $10,000 renewal grant for an additional school year to continue their successful programs to promote on-time high school graduation.

“Ford Fund is very proud of its collaboration with LULAC. Together we provide invaluable resources to help the councils build a stronger and brighter future for thousands of students in their own communities,” said Joe Avila, manager, Ford Motor Company Fund. “Education has long been a priority for Ford and we remain committed to helping our young people advance in school and reach their academic dreams.”

The new 2017 grant recipients are:

  • Council #2890 Hollister, California
  • Council #5294 Pilsen, Illinois
  • Council #13004 Holland, Michigan
  • Council #20009 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Council #214 Houston, Texas
  • Council #44017 South Jordan, Utah
  • Council #4614 Richmond, Virginia
  • Council #11126 Washington, DC
  • Council #2862 Sacramento, California (renewal grant)
  • Council #313 Chicago, Illinois (renewal grant)

Angelica Eggers is a beneficiary of the Ford Driving Dreams Grants program through the San Antonio LULAC Council #4619. Eggers participated in the Ford Driving Dreams program during her freshman and sophomore years at South San Antonio High School. This fall, she plans to attend Texas A&M University in San Antonio and major in criminology. “My hard work is paying off and because of the Ford Driving Dreams Grants program and LULAC, I am excited about going to college to earn my degree and reach my goals,” said Eggers.

“Helping young people succeed is a constant effort we have made possible in association with Ford Motor Company Fund so students can graduate high school on time and pursue a college education. Today, we celebrate and recognize the work of the Councils who are making sure that their communities are being empowered through academic excellence,” said Brent Wilkes, chief executive officer of LULAC.

Earlier this year, Ford Fund impacted the lives of San Antonio students with a donation of 10,000 new books to elementary schools, a reading party for second and third-graders at Miguel Carrillo, Jr. Elementary School, and $50,000 in scholarships awarded to 25 high school students preparing for college this fall.

Joe Avila, manager, Ford Motor Company Fund.

Ford Driving Dreams Grants has invested more than $1.3 million since its launch in 2010. More than 1,500 students and 60 Councils have been able to leverage their success to impact the lives of high school students across the country. Each FDD grant recipient will develop a sustainable program that reflect the local education landscape and relies on partnerships with local education institutions. For more information on the Ford Driving Dreams Grants, visit www.forddrivingdreams.com.

Ford Motor Company Fund has invested close to $5 million in scholarships and other education initiatives across the country, Panama, and Puerto Rico. In addition to Ford Driving Dreams, other Ford Fund educational programs include Ford Blue Oval Scholars, Ford Next Generation Learning, Ford College Community Challenge, and the Ford STEAM Lab. For more information, visit www.forddrivingdreams.com

May 102017
 

Motor vehicle accidents are the leading cause of death for teens in the United States, but the way in which states and parents regulate teen behavior can have a huge impact. Latino Traffic Report has learned that a new analysis by CarInsurance.com found safe driving environments for teens vary greatly by state, with Maryland and New York ranking among the safest.

In contrast, Montana and North Dakota have the most dangerous driving environments for teens.

The safest states for teen drivers are:

  1. Maryland
  2. New York
  3. Pennsylvania
  4. Connecticut
  5. Massachusetts

The most dangerous states for teen drivers are:

  1. Montana
  2. North Dakota
  3. Kansas
  4. Wyoming
  5. Alabama

This is the second year that CarInsurance.com performed this analysis. Maryland and Massachusetts are the only states from last year’s top three to again make the top three this year (Massachusetts and Alaska were first and third respectively last year).

Montana and North Dakota are again the bottom two states this year. Last year, Louisiana joined them as third from the bottom.

To identify the best and worst states for teen drivers, CarInsurance.com analyzed five teen-driving metrics:

  • Number of teen driver fatalities per 100,000 population
  • Effectiveness of Graduated Driving License (GDL) components
  • Teen drinking and driving rates
  • Teen emailing/texting and driving rates
  • Average annual insurance costs for teen drivers

Results this year compared to last year

New winner this year:

  • Maryland topped our list this year as the safest state for teen drivers, after finishing second last year.
  • The state had a low number of teen-related fatal accidents in 2015 (.3 per 100,000 residents) and has some of the strongest GDL laws in the country.
  • The new Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System results on driving and drinking or texting were the major differences this year

Why last’s years No. 1 fell in rankings:

  • Last year’s safest state, Massachusetts, dropped to fifth place this year. The Bay State continued having one of the lowest teen-related fatal accident rate and strong GDL laws, which helped it to edge out California and Virginia for the No. 5 rank.
  • Massachusetts survey numbers were worse than Maryland’s, which contributed to Massachusetts dropping from the top spot.

The losers stay the same:

  • On the other side, Montana and North Dakota remained in the bottom two spots.
  • Both states had a high per capita number of fatal accidents involving teens, lacked strong GDL provisions, and experienced poor teen survey results for drinking while driving and texting while driving.

To get complete rankings, see how states fared on individual metrics and to read our methodology, view the full story “Teen driving safety: Least and most dangerous states.”