The Most Dangerous States for Car Crashes

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Mar 182020
 

Latino Traffic Report has learned that there were 33,654 fatal motor vehicle crashes in the United States in 2018 in which 36,560 deaths occurred, according to the latest report by the U.S. Department of Transportation. The number and types of motor vehicle crash deaths differ widely among the 50 states and the District of Columbia. A state’s population has an obvious effect on the number of motor vehicle deaths, as well as types of vehicles driven, travel speeds, state traffic laws, emergency care capabilities, weather, and topography.

There were 11.2 deaths per 100,000 people and 1.13 deaths per 100 million miles traveled. The fatality rate per 100,000 people ranged from 4.4 in the District of Columbia to 22.2 in Mississippi. The death rate per 100 million miles traveled ranged from 0.54 in Massachusetts to 1.83 in South Carolina.

In 2018, Wyoming had the highest percentage of deaths involving SUV and pickup occupants (49 percent) and a relatively low percentage of deaths involving car occupants (23 percent). In contrast, Vermont had the highest percentage of deaths involving car occupants (49 percent) and a relatively low percentage of deaths involving SUV and pickup occupants (26 percent).

Other factors contributing to crashes include blood alcohol levels (BAC) and the use of seatbelts. While not all states report BAC for all passenger vehicle drivers, 31 states and the District of Columbia had BAC reporting rates of at least 70 percent. Among these states, Montana had the highest estimated percentage of fatally injured drivers with BACs of 0.08 percent or higher (45 percent) and West Virginia had the lowest (12 percent).

In 2018, fatally injured occupants were approximately half as likely to use restraints compared with the nationwide average. The state with the highest observed seat belt use for front seat occupants was Hawaii, at 98 percent, while the lowest was New Hampshire at 76 percent. California had the highest restraint use percentage among fatally injured occupants at 61 percent while New Hampshire had the lowest at just 28 percent.

Finally, Texas ranked the highest among states with the most fatal traffic accidents (3,305) in 2018 while Mississippi had the highest death rate per 100,000 population. For a listing of rates for every state go to www.iihs.org.

SUV Review: 2017 GMC Acadia

 GMC, Reviews  Comments Off on SUV Review: 2017 GMC Acadia
May 302017
 

On college campuses across the country, May is moving month. For the parents of these college students, this is when a Sport Utility Vehicle (SUV) can earn its sticker price. While moving my niece from Bryan, TX to San Antonio to attend the University of Texas at San Antonio, I had the opportunity to test the cargo-carrying ability of the redesigned 2017 GMC Acadia AWD SLT-1 for Latino Traffic Report. We took full advantage of every cubic foot of available cargo room the SUV had to offer.

As the word implies, a redesign starts on the outside and the all-new Acadia displays a more refined look with a dimensional grille, wraparound halogen headlamps, and standard LED lighting. GM invested $167 million at the Spring Hill, Tenn. assembly plant to support production of the 2017 Acadia and additional vehicles.

While SUVs aren’t known for their fuel efficiency, the new Acadia is 700 pounds lighter, which should help stretch a gallon of gasoline a little farther.

A 2.5-liter inline four-cylinder with direct injection and variable valve timing is new for 2017. It offers an EPA-estimated 26 miles per gallon (mpg) highway for front-wheel drive models. The test model, however, came with all-wheel drive and the optional 3.6-liter V6 engine that produces 310 horses and 271 lb.–ft. of torque and has a city/highway EPA estimated fuel efficiency of 18/25 mpg. During the weeklong loan that included a 185-mile road trip, I averaged 32.4 mpg on the highway and 17.2 in the city.

The test model also included the All Terrain package with badging throughout, an advanced Active Twin Clutch AWD system, 20-inch aluminum wheels, a cargo management system, and seating for five. While the Acadia can offer seating for seven, the All Terrain package replaces the third-row of seating with covered storage bins and a cargo management system in the rear cargo floor. For this trip, we focused on storage above the floor. The second row deployed easily to expose 79 cu. ft. of cargo space. We had room for multiple boxes and bags, but most impressive, was that the Acadia also fit a twin mattress. We didn’t need to tow but if we had, the Acadia included a Trailering Package ($650) that gives it a maximum towing capability of 4,000 pounds.

All Terrain models are also distinguished with a body-color grille surround, black chrome trim and unique wheels on the outside.

The user-friendly GMC IntelliLink system has been enhanced to include phone integration technology via Apple CarPlay and Android Auto compatibility. The test model also included navigation, a 4G LTE WiFi hotspot, OnStar, and SiriusXM Satellite radio for three months, as well as a panoramic sunroof. The shade, however, snaps back with some force so little fingers may need to beware.

Other standard convenience features on the Acadia include cruise control, keyless open and start, a rear vision camera, remote keyless entry, and a leather-wrapped steering wheel.

Safety features will always matter, particularly on a family vehicle like the Acadia and GMC features two new standard technologies—a Rear Seat Reminder that alerts the driver to check the seat before locking the car and the Teen Driver system that allows parents to program the Acadia to allow certain features to encourage safer driving. It prevents certain safety systems from being turned off and even provides parents with a report on their teen’s driving habits.

More common safety technology, like a blind spot monitor and rear cross-traffic alert, are available on the SLE-2 trim and are standard on the SLT-1 trim and above. Advanced technology like forward collision alert and the safety alert seat that vibrates to warn the driver, come with the Driver Alert Package II, standard only on SLT-2 and Denali trims.

The starting price for the 2017 GMC Acadia is $29,995. The as-tested price, that included several packages, came to $47,465.

: The Acadia offers the versatility and convenience that’s expected of an SUV.

No: Safety features, like a blind spot monitor, should be available across the lineup and not just reserved for higher trim levels.